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Posted on Thursday, November 18 @ 18:17:57 CST by administrator

News During a period of time when I was involved in restoring my Kawasaki H1 Triple, I ran into this seller on e-bay during my hunt for parts ever so often, who always ended his item description with these words.

Four simple words that can pose quite a riddle and can often become the start of many a heated discussion among owners of older bikes.

Four simple words that form a question that has been asked on this board frequently. With the price of parts – especially NOS parts – reaching the stratosphere and prices for complete bikes seemingly not keeping up with that trend, it becomes a very viable question and (I believe), we as an active community involved with the CBX should have a saying in determining the value of our bikes. After all, we are the ones who have an interest in them.

Two major criteria influence the value of a bike. One, the objective one, is the condition, the other, the intangible one is the emotional factor which includes individual desire and preference, regional availability and fashion trends.

Often, we see lists of motorcycle auctions, and they list a number in an attempt to briefly describe the condition. Some use a scale of 1 to 10, others 1 to 5, and one commonly used by major auction houses and appraisers is 1 to 6. I have recently read through some used bike price reports and looked at some auction results. Let’s look at how this all comes together.

The description of the condition and the CBX sample prices for bikes in the respective category does not reflect my opinion. It is quoted in part from the Vintage Motorcycle Price Guide, and will most certainly create some controversy. Bear in mind, that you have to consider yourself more educated about CBXes and their prices than an objective outsider. I have only found the 1979 and 1980 models in the price guides. It seems the Prolink variations are “too new” to be of interest to the vintage bike “community”.



Condition 1 (Excellent) Restored to maximum professional standards of quality in every area or perfect original with components operating and appearing as new. A 95-plus-point show motorcycle that is not being ridden anymore. In a sense, this has ceased to be a motorcycle and has become an object of art. It is transported to events in an enclosed trailer and it is stored in a climate controlled facility. There are very few true No. 1 bikes.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 1 $6,500.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 1 $6,000.-

1981 Honda CBX , 15 miles, Condition 1, sold at Mid-America Vintage MC Auction in Las Vegas on February 5-7, 2004 for $7,500.-



Condition 2 (Fine) Well-restored, or a combination of superior restoration and excellent original. Also, an extremely well maintained original showing minimal wear. Except for the very closest inspection, a condition 2 vehicle may appear as a condition 1. It may be ridden limited miles each year to events, on tours and simply for pleasure.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 2 $4,550.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 2 $4,200.-

1982 Honda CBX, Condition 2, sold at J.Wood, Daytona MC Auction, Deland, FL, March 5, 2004 for $2,500.-



Condition 3 (Very Good) Completely operateable original or “older restoration” showing wear.
Also, has a good amateur restoration, all presentable and serviceable inside and out. Plus, combinations of well-done restoration and good operable components; or a partially restored motorcycle with all parts necessary to complete it and/or valuable NOS parts.
Bike may look perfect from 20 feet away, but as you get closer you realize that the paint may get thin in areas from washing and polishing, you may detect some wear on the seat, tank and engine.The chrome, while still quite presentable may have lost the sharp, mirror-like reflective quality it had when new. All systems and equipment on the bike are in good operating order.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 3 $2,600.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 3 $2,400.-

1979 Honda CBX, modified, Condition 3, sold at J.Wood, Daytona MC Auction, Deland, FL,
March 5, 2004 for $2,500.-

1980 Honda CBX , Serial No 26 Condition 3, sold at Mid-America Vintage MC Auction in Las Vegas on February 5-7, 2004 for $5,600.-

1981 Honda CBX , Condition 3, sold at Mid-America Vintage MC Auction in Las Vegas on February 5-7, 2004 for $6,100.-




Condition 4 (Good) A rideable vehicle needing no, or only minor, work to be functional. Also, has a deteriorated restoration or a very poor amateur restoration. All components may need restoration to be “excellent’, but the motorcycle is mostly useable “as is”.
This bike is a rider. It may be in the process of restoration, but even from 20 feet away, there is no doubt that it needs help.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 4 $1,300.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 4 $1,200.-



Condition 5 (Restorable) Needs complete restoration. May or may not be running, but isn’t weathered, wrecked, and/or stripped to the point of being useful only for parts. May have some of the original parts in boxes. The motorcycle may not be operable but it is essentially all there and has only minor surface rust, if any rust at all. A challenge to the restorer but no chasing for missing parts.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 5 $ 780.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 5 $ 720.-



Condition 6 (Parts Bike) May or may not be running, but is weathered, wrecked, and/or stripped to the point of being useful primarily for parts. This is an incomplete or greatly deteriorated, perhaps rusty, vehicle that has value only as a parts donor for other restoration projects. It usually comes in form of a frame and parts.

Value of 1979 Honda CBX in Condition 6 $ 260.-

Value of 1980 Honda CBX in Condition 6 $ 240.-



As you see, the actual transaction prices of bikes offered in live auctions, often exceed the prices quoted in “price guides”. I don’t even want to go to mention ebay here. Also the “jumps” from category to category for prices as well as condition description are rather significant and we need to consider there are many levels of in-between.

Maybe someone will have the time to start a “sales registry” which will list data for bikes that change hands, when and where, at what price. This data could eventually proof invaluable if anyone of us will have to start arguing with an insurance company about compensation for a total loss, either due to theft or a catastrophic event.

 
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What Is It Worth? by ems


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